Soft Sourdough Sandwich White Bread

by - September 07, 2019


              Yudane Method                           vs                       Without Yudane Method
Soft Sourdough Sandwich White Bread

It has been a while since I made white bread for my family.  I was experimenting with soft bread using the Yudane Method vs without Yudane Method.  For me personally, I still prefer to use the Yudane Method despite it requiring an extra step because the result is worth the little extra effort.  

Yudane method is quite similar to Tangzhong (water-roux) method.  Both methods are scalding method. For the Yudane method, boiling water is used to scald the flour instead of cooking over the fire.   Please click here to see the differences between  Yudane vs Tangzhong Method. 

Characteristic of bread using Yudane Method:  The texture is especially soft, fluffy and moist on the first day and it lasts very well for 2 - 3 days.  There is a very slight mild sourness.  

Characteristic of bread without Yudane Method:  The texture is soft, fluffy and moist on the first day.  However, it lost a little softness and moisture on the second day.  Subsequently,  become quite dry on the 4 or 5 days.   It is best to eat on the same day or toast it after second day.  There is a very slight mild sourness.

It is advisable to read the General Notes before baking.

GENERAL NOTES:

KNEADING TIME
For kneading, please regard the timing provided as an indication only. It is only meant as a guide.  Timing may differ depending on the brand of flour and electric mixer used. The protein content may vary from one brand of flour to another.

OVER KNEADING
Some have experienced the dough breaking during the second proofing.  If that happens it is due to over kneading.  Please stop the machine and check your dough during the final cycle of kneading to ensure that you don't over knead. Every machine is different and there is always a chance of over-kneading when using a machine. You may need to adjust this timing and stop as soon as you reach the window pane stage.

FLOUR
The right flour plays a very important role in bread making.  Usually bread flour content around 11.5 - 13.5% protein, while high gluten flour is around 13.5 - 14.5%.  All purpose flour content less protein around 9 - 11%.  To achieve fluffy, soft and light bread, I used Japan High Gluten Flour in most of my bread baking.  Sources from here and here.

HYDRATION
The liquid measurement given is also a guide.  It is advisable to always reserve some liquid and not add it all in one go.  This would give you the opportunity to adjust if necessary. If dough is too dry, add the reserve liquid one tablespoon at a time until the right consistency.  This is because each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently. 

PROOFING
Please note that the proofing timing may also vary depending on your climate and environment. The humidity and temperature at your place will influence how dough rises.  
If you are unable to judge by just looking at the dough, you can do the finger poke test:
  1. Proofing Test:
    • Lightly press the side of the proved dough with your finger.  If it bounces back immediately without any indentation, it means the dough is under proved and needs more time before baking.
    • If the indentation stays and it doesn’t bounce back, it means it has been over proved.
    • If the indentation slowly bounces back and leave a small indentation, it is ready to bake. Or if the dough springs back slowly, like it’s waking up from a long nap, and your prod leaves only a small indentation, it’s ready to go.
    • There will be a final burst of rising once the bread is placed to bake in the oven and it is called oven spring. 
WRINKLE TOP OR SHRINKING
If your bread collapses or gets wrinkled on top after removing from oven, it could be because your dough over proved during the second proofing. Please proof your dough until it just reaches or is slightly below the rim of the pan.

BAKING
Do also note that the baking temperature and timing provided are what works for my oven and should also be regarded as a guide only. Every oven behaves a little differently, so please adjust accordingly for your oven.

SOURDOUGH STARTER
A healthy starter is very crucial as advised by Baking with Gina.  It is advisable to feed your starter daily if you want your bread to rise nicely and to use the starter (levain) at its peak.  

If the mother starter is not strong, the bread dough will not rise a lot even though the starter is used at its peak.

I used more levain (sourdough starter) in my soft bread recipe to get less sourness taste. This sounds weird right? More starter will make the dough rise faster and less time needed for the dough to digest and produce acids. The acids give the sourness taste. In resulting less acids produce and bread become less sour.

If you have any questions regarding this recipe or any other post, please leave me a comment in the “LEAVE A COMMENT” link and I will reply you as soon as possible.


Incase you are looking for Soft Sourdough White Bread, please click here for the latest recipe.

Recipe - Soft Sourdough Sandwich White Bread 

Yields:  1 loaf


YUDANE METHOD

Total Flour is 255g + 95g (from levain) = 350g

 


INGREDIENTS:

 

Yudane:

50g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)

50g boiling water

 

Levain - 190g total (ratio 1:3:3):
30g sourdough starter (100% Hydration)
90g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
90g water

Main Dough:
205g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
36g (3 Tbsp) brown sugar 
1 tsp salt
26g butter, room temperature
45g egg, whisked 
45g full cream milk (whole milk)

 

Utensil:

450g pullman loaf pan (20cm X 10cm X 10cm)

 


 

WITHOUT YUDANE METHOD

Total Flour is 255g + 95g (from levain) = 350g

 

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

Levain - 190g total (ratio 1:3:3):
30g sourdough starter (100% Hydration)
90g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
90g water

Main Dough:
255g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
36g (3 Tbsp) brown sugar 
1 tsp salt
26g butter, room temperature
45g egg, whisked 
95g - 105g full cream milk (whole milk), Use 95g first.  Add in another 10g later if too dry.

 

Utensil:

450g pullman loaf pan (20cm X 10cm X 10cm) 

 


METHOD:
  1. Yudane (Omit this step for bread without Yudane Method)
    1. Add bread flour in a bowl, pour the boiling water and mix well with spatula or spoon.  
    2. Cling film and place in the fridge for at least 4 hours or overnight.  
    3. Take out from the fridge 30 minutes before using to return to room temperature.
    4. Note:  I made the yudane dough 4 hours before and left it outside instead in the fridge. It works too. 
  2. Levain:
    1. One night before baking, mix all ingredients in a jar and cover.
    2. Let it ferment in aircond room temperature in tropical climate (approximately 25C) overnight until tripled.  It took about 10 - 12 hours. The total weight should be around 210g.  But, will need only 190g.
    3. Note:  If you like to prepare levain on the same baking day, please use the ratio 1:1:1.  Let it ferment in our tropical room temperature until tripled.  It took about 3-5 hours depend how strong is your starter.
  3. Main Dough:
    1. Put all ingredients (except butter), including the 190g sourdough starter (levain) and all yudane dough (for Yudane Method only) into a bowl of stand mixer.
    2. Slightly combine the mixture by hand with the paddle attachment before turning on the machine so that the flour will not splash out.  Using the paddle attachment, mix for 2 minutes or until all incorporated.  
    3. Change to hook attachment and knead for another 3 minutes or until the dough comes together. Add in butter and continue knead for 10 - 12 minutes or until reach window pane stage.  During the whole kneading process, I stopped few times to scrape down the dough from the hook to be sure it is evenly kneaded and also to prevent the motor from overheating.
  4. To shape:
    1. Punch down the dough to release the air if any. Transfer the dough to a clean floured surface then divide into 2 equal portions.
    2. Form each portion to a ball.  Flatten with rolling pin into a dish.  
    3. Fold right to centre and fold left overlap it.  Roll out with rolling pin into long rectangle shape. Roll up the dough like Swiss Roll until a small log is formed. 
    4. Place all dough in the prepared loaf pan.  Let it proof at warm and dark place until the dough reaches almost the height of the pan but you still can close the lid.(This one took 4.5 hours at room temperature of 28C - 30C) then put on the slide-on lid. Then leave it continue to rise for another 30 - 60 minutes.
  5. To bake:
    1. Preheat oven at 190C (top & bottom heat) or 170C (fan-forced) for 15 minutes.
    2. Bake at preheated oven for 30 -  40  minutes, or until golden brown.
    3. Remove bread from oven and let it cool on rack completely before slicing.


You May Also Like

33 comments

  1. Hi, i tried your recipe with the yudane method, i follow your instructions, except that i had to add more milk because the dough a bit dry and i bake it on a regular loaf pan whatever the bread came out so soft and fluffy.
    It was delicious, thanks for the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thank you for trying this recipe and happy to hear that you like the result. Yes, it is because each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  2. Your bread looks great! Will the recipe still work if I leave out the butter? I'm thinking it might be a bit drier than normal bread but I'm okay with that, just curious as I have never tried it before. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, I never tried without oil. I don't know how it it will turn out. But I think It will definitely will be dry. You may want to increase the liquid amount. Cheers :)

      Delete
  3. Hello,
    If I want to make levain in ratio 1:1:1, then what should be the total quantity of levain?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, the total quantity of levain is the same. Just feed 50g starter + 50g flour + 50g water. But, use only 140g of levain.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  4. Thank you soo much. I tried the recipe and came out really well. My family loved it. Thanks. Cheers :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for trying this recipe and your kind feedback. May I know which recipe that you tried? With or without Yudane method?
      Cheers :)

      Delete
    2. Hi,
      I tried the recipe with Yudane method. It turned out well. First time I tried the recipe ad it is. The second time I increased the recipe by 1.5 times, results were different, as in the texture and softness. Can you guide on that?

      Delete
    3. Hi, How is the texture like? Not so soft? Once you increase the recipe, maybe need more time to knead to achieve the window pane stage. This is what I can think of.

      Delete
  5. Hi,want to try this recipe, if i want a more sour taste, should i add more levain? as i like the sour taste....thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for asking. Actually, the more levain will yields less sour bread because it will take less time to ferment. If you want more sour taste then retard the dough in the fridge and bake the next day.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  6. Hi, I'm new to this sourdough stuff, can i check after using the amt required for the levin then what to do with the balance?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for asking and welcome to sourdough baking.

      This is what I did. I always keep 2 bottles of sourdough discard in my fridge. One is old discard and another one is the latest discard. We use latest discard as mother sourdough starter to feed for the next baking. The old discard will be used to make pancake or sourdough crackers and others. You can search for sourdough crackers in my blog if you are interested.

      I hope this helps.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  7. Do you feed the discard back to the sourdough?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jaclyn,

      Sorry I don't really get your question?

      I always keep two bottles of sourdough starter in the fridge. One is the discard and another one is the latest sourdough starter. I used the latest sourdough starter as mother sourdough starter for feeding. Then the balance will go to the discard bottle.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  8. May I know how you prepare the sour dough starter and use on levain?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for asking. Sourdough starter and levain are the same thing. You can watch this Youtube. I followed her method.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6pGkOuZnrk

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  9. Do you think this sourdough method would work in the breadmachine?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jaclyn,

      I don't use breadmaker. I think it should work too.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  10. Is it possible to do one of the proofs in the fridge? Both timings seem like you would be baking the loaf in the evening. I would like to bake in the morning or early afternoon. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thanks for asking.
      Maybe you can prepare in the evening and let it rise in room temperature overnight. This bread will probably take 6 hours or more to rise depend how strong is your starter and also the temperature in your area.

      I have tried another recipe with the below schedule. This is just a guideline. Maybe you need less or more time to rise.

      7 pm - Prepared Yudane Dough & Levain
      11 pm - 12 am - Start preparing the bread dough
      9 am - Bake time

      Cheers :)
      Yeanley

      Delete
    2. If you retard your bread dough in the fridge, I afraid your bread will turn out sour.

      Delete
  11. That is still a very inconvenient bake time. I like my sleep, but also if you're baking at 9 am, that means you've put in the pan to rise at 5 am? This timing doesn't correlate to what you have in the recipe. I'm confused, sorry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Please find a convenience schedule that suit you. As I mentioned, you can retard your bread dough in the fridge. But, please bear in mind the bread will taste slightly sour if you don't mind.

      The above schedule I mentioned is just an idea and for another recipe as I said.

      You have to try and play around with it. Just bear in mind, sourdough bread dough proofing is very unexpected.

      Hope this helps.

      Cheers and thanks for asking again.

      Delete
  12. Hi,
    Can the bread (freshly baked) be frozen and re-heat in oven 2 days later?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, To be honest, I never tried frozen bread. If you are going to eat in two days then just store in the fridge instead. Reheat or toast the bread when you want to eat.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  13. Hi,
    Can the bread made with Yudane method be frozen? If yes, then how to re-heat it when I want to eat it?
    My kid loves the bread as it is soft, fluffy and has only a mild sour taste(not obvious at all).
    Thank you in advance for your feedback.

    Cheers and have a wonderful day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe and your kind feedback. As per my reply on the above, you should store in the fridge instead if you are going to eat in two days. Maybe you should not slice the bread, keep in the fridge. Reheat in oven for may 10 mins before serving. This is just my suggestion. I never done that before and hope it will work.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  14. Hi, could you use this dough to make pull apart rolls?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi, For medical reasons i would like to try to eat sourdough bread more instead of normal white bread. I am totally new zero knowledge of this. Which is the basic recipe would you recommend ?
    My fren gave me the sourdough starter, she just asked me to feed it and feed it and i dont know what to do with it ?
    Saw your above recipe mentioned 30g sourdough starter (100% Hydration). What is the 100% hydration means ? how do i know if my starter is 100% hydration or not. Please advise. thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for asking and reading this recipe. The above recipe is a soft bread it means fat and sugar are used.

      This is the basic soft bread recipe that you can try: https://www.bakewithpaws.com/2019/05/basic-soft-sourdough-bread.html

      However, please try to search online to understand more about sourdough starter first before baking.

      It is better to ask your friend to teach you how to feed it as I do not know what type of flour that she used to make the starter from.

      A "100% hydration sourdough starter" means it's 1 part water and 1 part flour. In other words, for every gram of flour there's a corresponding gram of water, hence 100% of the flour is hydrated.

      Please click here to understand more: https://www.chiceats.com/recipe/homemade-bread/how-make-and-maintain-sourdough-starter-aka-levain#:~:text=A%20%22100%25%20hydration%20sourdough%20starter,1%3A1%20ratio%20in%20mind.

      I hope this helps.

      Cheers :)

      Delete

-->