Breads (Yeast) - Loaves

Japanese Soft White Bread/Shokupan (Yudane Method)

July 24, 2020 | Recipe by Bake with Paws
Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)

Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)

Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)


I am the fond of the Yudane method.  I used exactly the same recipe of Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)  and baked with the lid on to make it into a Pullman Sandwich Bread (Pain De Mie).    The original recipe is adapted from Chopstick Chronicles. 

This bread is super fluffy, soft and moist.  It seems to stay fresh longer than most other ordinary homemade bread.  

Yudane method is quite similar to Tangzhong (water-roux) method.  Both methods are scalding method. For the Yudane method, boiling water is used to scald the flour instead of cooking over the fire.   Please click here to see the differences between  Yudane vs Tangzhong Method. 

I have other Yudane Method recipes that you may like to try too.   Yudane Method Bread recipes.

If you have any questions regarding this recipe or any other post, please leave me a comment in the “LEAVE A COMMENT” link and I will reply you as soon as possible.

Recipe - Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan) Pullman Loaf 


Yields:  1 loaf

INGREDIENTS:

Yudane:
65g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
65g boiling water

Bread:
260g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
1 1/2 tsp instant yeast  (can be reduced to 1 tsp)
28g brown sugar
1 tsp salt
13g butter
185g fresh milk or full cream milk (start with 170g first, reserve 15g to add in slowly if the dough too dry,  you do not need to use all.)

Utensils:
450g loaf pan (21.3 X 12.2 X 11.5 cm  /  8.4" X 4.8" X 4.5")

METHOD:

Yudane:
  1. Add bread flour in a bowl, pour the boiling water and mix well with spatula or spoon.  
  2. Cling film and place in the fridge for at least 4 hours or overnight.  
  3. Take out from the fridge 30 minutes before using to return to room temperature.
Bread:
  1. Put all ingredients (except butter) and including yudane dough (tear into pieces) into the bowl of a stand mixer. Mix with paddle attachment for 2 minutes or until all incorporated.  Change to hook attachment and knead for another 3 minutes or until the dough comes together. Add in butter and continue kneading for another 10 - 13 minutes or until the dough comes together, become elastic, smooth and reaches window pane stage.  I noticed that it is harder to achieve a very thin window pane  with Yudane method dough. It could be due to the gelatinization of its starch.  It is fine if your window pane is not very thin as long as you have kneaded the dough long enough. During the whole kneading process, I stopped few times to scrape down the dough from the hook to be sure it is evenly kneaded and also to prevent the motor from overheating.
  2. Let the dough rise in a warm place for 45 to 60 minutes or until double in size in a large greased bowl, covered with cling film or kitchen towel.
  3. Shaping:
    1. Punch down the dough to release the air. Transfer the dough to a clean floured surface then divide into 3 equal portions. 
    2. Form each portion into a ball.  
    3. Flatten with rolling pin. 
    4. Roll the dough like a swiss roll into a log.
    5. Flatten the log with rolling pin as shown.
    6. Roll up the dough again like a swiss roll until a small log is formed. 
    7. Place all the dough in the prepared loaf pan. 
  4. Let the dough rise for 30 minutes or till 90% of the size, slightly below the rim of the pan.   
  5. Cover the pan with lid, then preheat oven at 190C (top & bottom heat) or 170C (fan-forced) for 10 - 15 minutes.
  6. After 10 to 15 minutes after preheating oven, bake for 25 - 40 minutes or until golden brown.  Open the lid after 25 minutes to check.  Remove from oven if already golden brown or bake for another 5 - 10 minutes more without lid accordingly to your oven.  With this new loaf pan (Chefmade Carbon Steel Loaf Pan), the baking time has been reduced compared with my previous baked.
  7. Remove bread from oven and the pan, let it cool completely on rack before slicing.




Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan) - Square Bread


Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)

Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)


It is the same recipe and baked in two Square Loaf Pan (11.5 X 11.4 X 10.6 cm  / 4.5" X 4.5" X 4.2")

SHAPPING & BAKING:
  1. Shaping:
    1. Punch down the dough to release the air. Transfer the dough to a clean floured surface then divide into 4 equal portions. 
    2. Form each portion into a ball.  
    3. Flatten with rolling pin. 
    4. Roll the dough like a swiss roll into a log.
    5. Flatten the log with rolling pin as shown.
    6. Roll up the dough again like a swiss roll until a small log is formed. 
    7. Place 2  pieces of dough in a loaf pan. 
  2. Let the dough rise for 30 minutes or till 90% of the size, slightly below the rim of the pan.   
  3. Cover the pan with lid, then preheat oven at 190C (top & bottom heat) or 170C (fan-forced) for 10 - 15 minutes.
  4. After 10 - 15 minutes, bake for 20 - 30 minutes or until golden brown.  Open the lid after 20 minutes to check.  Remove from oven if already golden brown or bake for another 5 - 10 minutes more without lid accordingly to your oven.  
  5. Remove bread from oven and the pan, let it cool completely on rack before slicing.

Japanese Soft White Bread (Shokupan)

GENERAL NOTES:

GLUTEN DEVELOPMENT & WINDOWPANE TEST
Gluten forms when flour comes in contact with water.  Hydration of the flour causes the sticky and stretchy protein to form, giving structure to the bread.  This makes your bread trap air and rise. 

Gluten in dough can be developed by autolyse, resting, kneading or folding.

The windowpane test is used to determine whether the dough has been sufficiently kneaded.  By gently pulling the dough (or you may pinch off some dough) and trying to stretch it into a thin membrane.  If you are able to stretch the dough paper thin and translucent  without tearing, then the gluten is fully developed.  However, if you can stretch it without tearing but the membrane is not transparent, then the gluten is not yet fully developed.  

However, from my experience not all the recipe can achieve a thin and translucent window pane stage easily.   For example low hydration and low fat dough.  For such recipes, a reasonable window pane is good enough and it can be left to rest. Gluten will continue to develop while resting.  Exercising restraint to not over-knead the dough prevents the gluten from being overworked and broken.   Some of you may have experienced the dough breaking during the second proofing.  It is because the dough is over kneaded. 

The total kneading time for me is usually 15 minutes at low speeds except brioche dough with high fat percentage or dough using liquid fat which usually takes a little longer (maybe 18-20 mins).

From my experience, I found that high hydration dough with high percentage of fat will be easy to stretch and achieve a paper thin windowpane stage.


KNEADING TIME
For kneading, please regard the timing provided as an indication only. It is only meant as a guide.  Timing may differ depending on the brand of flour and electric mixer used. The protein content may vary from one brand of flour to another.

FLOUR
The right flour plays a very important role in bread making.   To achieve fluffy, soft and light bread, I used Japan High Gluten Flour in most of my bread baking.  The protein content is around  12 - 13%.

HYDRATION
The liquid measurement given is also a guide.  It is advisable to always reserve some liquid and not add it all in one go.  This would give you the opportunity to adjust if necessary. If dough is too dry, add the reserve liquid one tablespoon at a time until the right consistency.  This is because each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently. 

PROOFING
Please note that the proofing timing may also vary depending on your climate and environment. The humidity and temperature at your place will influence how dough rises.  
If you are unable to judge by just looking at the dough, you can do the finger poke test:
  1. First Proofing:
    • Lightly flour or oil your finger or knuckle, gently poke in the centre of the dough then remove your finger.  If it bounces back immediately without any indentation then it needs more time.
    • If the indentation stays and it doesn’t bounce back or if the dough collapses, then the it is over proved.  
    • If it bounces back just a little, then the dough is ready to be punched down and shaping.
  2. Second Proofing:
    • Lightly press the side of the proved dough with your finger.  If it bounces back immediately without any indentation, it means the dough is under proved and needs more time before baking.
    • If the indentation stays and it doesn’t bounce back, it means it has been over proved.
    • If the indentation slowly bounces back and leave a small indentation, it is ready to bake. 
    • There will be a final burst of rising once the bread is placed to bake in the oven and it is called oven spring. 
WRINKLE TOP OR SHRINKING
If your bread collapses or gets wrinkled on top after removing from oven, it could be because your dough over proved during the second proofing. Please proof until it rises 80 - 90% in size or is slightly below the rim of the pan.

BAKING TEMPERATURE & TIME
Do also note that the baking temperature and timing provided are what works for my oven and should also be regarded as a guide only. Every oven behaves a little differently, so please adjust accordingly for your oven.

Comments

  1. Hi, can share which Japanese flour brand you use? Any photo and where you buy it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for asking. Sorry, I don't know the brand because it is a repacked flour and no brand stated on the packaging. I got it from House of Ingredients if you are in KL.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  2. may I know. is your dough fit exactly to 450gr pan? because if I sum, than your dough is more than 450gr

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for asking. Yes, it fit nicely. I know the total weight of the dough is about 610g. Just to let you know, I used Chefmade 450g Loaf Pan.
      But, please do not over proof the bread after closing the lid. I let it proof for about another 10 mins then bake. If you over proof the dough will overflow during baking.

      Please judge by your instinct depending on the patern of proofing on that day. Sometimes it takes very fast to rise and sometimes take longer than usual.

      I hope it helps.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  3. May I know how to calculate your dough into loafpan? thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, I still have not figure out. But, the above is based on my experiments. thanks

      Delete
  4. I would like to use natural starter instead of commercial yeast. How much will be?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, I have several soft sourdough bread recipes. You can search under categories.

      These are two recipes for white bread:

      https://www.bakewithpaws.com/2019/05/soft-sourdough-bread-with-yudane-method.html

      https://www.bakewithpaws.com/2019/09/soft-sourdough-sandwich-white-bread.html

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  5. Hi! I made this today and it's SO good. Mine's not as evenly golden but fantastic for a first try. Question - my crust was somewhat different, a little crisper on some sides then others. None of them had that really good, thin papery crust. Almost like the crust had been slightly toasted. Is this an issue with my oven temp? I went with 190 C but perhaps I should go with 170 C? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for trying this recipe and your kind feedback. Yes, it could be your oven. The heat in the oven is not even, too hot at certain area.

      May I know what type of loaf pan that you used?

      Try to adjust to the temperature that work for you ya.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
    2. Hi! I used a 7.5 x 4 x 4.4 in pan (this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B081NDTV26/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). I also tried a second time and used less liquid, worked out much better! It was still kind of toasty/crisp out of the oven for a day. After sitting for a day, the crust was very soft and tender.

      Wondering if that's more common? I would love for it to come straight out of the oven tender.

      Thank you BTW for your answer!

      Delete
    3. Hi, I used Chefmade loaf pan and made from Carbon steel. I just check your loaf pan and it is made from Aluminum Alloy. Not sure is caused by the pan.

      However, usually the bread will have crispy crust when it is just out from oven. It will soften after it cool down.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  6. I tried the recipe today using the Pullman tin. I didn’t managed to get the square shaped that I was hoping for. I started to bake the bread leaving about 2cm from the rim. Should I leave to proof longer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for trying this recipe. Yes, you should leave it to proof for another 10 - 15 mins if you read carefully on the method above. You have to try few times and then you will roughly know how to judge the timing.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
    2. Yikes.. I misread it... thanks! ☺️ Will try again!

      Delete
    3. Lol... Happy baking and hope you will get it this time :)

      Delete
  7. Can I use spelt flour with this bread recipe?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you can. But, the texture not as chewy and moist. I tried before and a bit dry if you don’t mind.

      Delete
  8. Can i use this recipe in the bread machine?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for visiting this page. Yes, of course you can.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  9. Hi, the recipe worked and the bread came out very nice, thank you for sharing! I have a larger pullman tin than the one you have.How should I increase the amount of ingredients?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, I am really sorry for late response. I must have missed your question. Thanks for trying this recipe and your kind feedback. May I know what is the size and capacity of your pan?

      Delete
  10. Hi! I’ve made this several times and it’s my go to recipe. However, I wonder if I can make the dough in advance and freeze it before proofing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe and your kind feedback.

      I have not tried freezing the dough. I am not sure. I would love to find out too. You can try and I am eager to know too.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  11. Hi Yeanley
    I baked this loaf in my brand new Pullman tin today and it was perfect! My fam was wowed by how nice it looked, then the texture was so soft...really great for egg salad sandwiches with tomato and cucumber :)
    I really appreciate your work--thanks for sharing these great recipes. I recommend you to my friends who are into baking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kevin,

      Thank you for trying this recipe and your kind feedback. I am so happy to hear that your family love it. This is my favourite sandwich white bread recipe using instant yeast.

      Again, thanks for sharing your feedback with me.

      Cheers and stay safe :)

      Delete
  12. Hello, thank you for sharing your recipes😊i have some question😊can i bloom the yeast for this recipes? I don’t have a pullman loaf pan. I only have a BakerS Secret Loaf Pan Large 9.29" X 5.19" X 2.54". Can i use this for this recipes and i plan to bake 2 loaf of bread. Should i double the recipes? Thank you😊

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for reading this recipe. I think can fit. Without trying I can't give you exact answer. Yes, you can double the recipe if you plan to bake 2 loaves instead.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  13. A good rule for deciding how much dough you can put into a pullman pan is 340g (12 oz) per liter of pullman pan volume. Check the pan volume by setting it level in a baking sheet on a towel (to catch the overflow). Then add water into the pullman til it just fills the pan. The number of grams of water is the volume of the pan in milliliters. Then weigh out the dough and form the loaves to meet the weight requirement of the pan. A 13-inch pullman pan that is 4"x4" is around 3000 ml so it will take about 1020g of dough (68% hydration, 0.6% instant dry yeast)

    ReplyDelete
  14. I didn't get this right the first time making it. But after a few loaves, it is now my favourite bread recipe! Been baking to give to friends as well and they love it so much! The tips and shaping guide that you give really help a lot. I would like to add that once I slide the lid on, I give it a press every now and then and once it stops rattling and I feel some resistance, then only I put it in to bake, resulting in a perfectly cuboid loaf. Thanks so much for sharing this recipe!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe. Practise made perfect. This is one of my favourite bread too.

      I am glad that it works for you and it is my pleasure to share..

      Cheers and stay safe !

      Delete
  15. Hi, how do I know if the dough is kneaded enough? Does the dough have to completely pull away from the bowl? Thks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,

      Thanks for reading this recipe. We usually said the dough will come together and pull away from the side of the bowl and achieve window pane stage. But, sometimes, after 5 - 6 minutes kneading the dough will come together too. For me I kneaded at least 10 - 12 minutes (total) and achieved a reasonable window pane for this recipe.

      Practice more and you will know how to judge and feel the dough.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  16. This recipe works!! But for health reason I am thinking of reducing the amount of instant yeast since 1.5 tsp for a loaf of bread seems too much. Would it affect the bread softness? Or is it just a longer proofing time?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Esther,

      Thanks for trying and your feedback.

      Yes, it is totally fine. It will not affect the softness of the bread. But, maybe will take slightly longer time to proof or maybe not.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  17. Thank you for the recipe. May I know if I want to have a less sweet loaf but keep its softness, can I reduce sugar? If yes, how much can I reduce to keeps its texture/rise? Do I also need to reduce salt when I reduce sugar? Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there, Yes you can. You can reduce to half or you may want to use honey. You do not need to cut down salt if you cut down sugar otherwise your bread will be tasteless.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
  18. Hi! I just tried this recipe for the first time. I left the dough in a covered bowl for the first proof, and after 1.5 hours the dough didn't rise at all, and the finger test leaves a dent that doesn't bounce back. Any idea what I did wrong?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe and sorry to hear that your dough didn't rise. The only reason I could think of is your yeast is not working I think. Please check the expiry date. You could test the yeast by adding 1/2 tsp of sugar and 1 tsp of yeast into 50ml cup of warm water. Wait for 10 minutes to see if any bubbles or activities. If no bubbles or any activities then your yeast must be expired or not working.

      I hope this help.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
    2. Thanks, I just did that test and the SAF instant yeast bubbled up nicely. It has been kept in the freezer since I first opened the package about 6 months ago. Someone told me that yeast needs to be mixed with warm water before adding to the other ingredients. Should I try this? Another thought is perhaps King Arthur High Gluten flour is not the same as the Japanese version (I didn't have any luck finding the Japanese kind online).

      Delete
    3. Hi, Hmm I really don't know then. If the yeast is working the dough should at least rise a little too. For Saf-instant yeast can be directly mixed with dry ingredients to form dough without being rehydrated. Please read their website: https://saf-instant.asia/my/home-baking/saf-instant-11g-gold/

      How about Bob's Red Mill Bread Flour? You may want to try this if you can get.
      https://www.bobsredmill.com/artisan-bread-flour.html

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  19. Hi! Thanks for the lovely recipe. May I know if I cut the recipe by half and just do 1 small square loaf, would the kneading time of 10-13 minutes after adding butter be the same even though I’m kneading a smaller amount of dough?

    Also just wanna check. I stored this bread in an ikea airtight container and the next day, the outer crust becomes quite hard and tough although inside still remain soft and fluffy. Does this happen to yours and is it supposed to be like that? Or is is supposed to still be soft outside even after a few days, as it’s made by Yudane method? Not sure if it’s cos I overkneaded so it became harder on the outside, as I stuck to your timing of 10-13 min kneading even though I made half batch only

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe and your feedback. You may need less time for kneading if you have the recipe. The timing is just a guide only. You need to check and feel the texture of your dough. I found it is very hard to knead if you cut the recipe into half. However, it is depend on your mixer too.

      Over kneading will break the gluten and will not cause the bread crust hard. The crust hard could be due to over baking. Please adjust your oven temperature ya.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  20. This is the best recipe, I do not own a stand mixer so I hand knead and use the slap and fold technique and the bread still turns out excellent. One question, do you think its possible to increase the amount of milk to increase the total hydration?

    I want a fluffier bread and I find that the slap and fold technique is much easier on higher hydration. Hoping to get your advice even though I know your recipe is for stand mixer only.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe and your kind feedback. Glad to hear that you like it.

      Yes, of course you can increase the milk. It is advisable to add milk slowly one tablespoon at a time until the right consistency that you want. This is because each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
  21. Hi, thanks for sharing your recipes. I am a fan of all of your bakes. I have been practising with this recipe. However, I haven't been able to get my dough to rise to just below the rim of the loaf pan even after an hour in very warm Singapore. It reaches 80% of the height of the pan at most (I use a 450g pan like you). After baking, I don't get a flat top. So it is a rather short loaf of bread. The dough does rise to double its size during the first proofing. What do you think is the problem? Should I increase the amount of ingredients to make a bigger loaf?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for trying this recipe and following my posts. There are two possibilities.
      1. It could be the flour. I have tried using normal bread flour and the bread turned out not very tall. Please try to get good quality of Japan High Gluten Flour and it make big different. You may want to look for Baking with Gina for Japan Bread flour if you are based in Singapore.
      2. It could be your instant yeast not very active and near expiry date.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  22. Hi
    I want to make this bread taller, do I readjust the recipe or do I proof longer... it may overproof!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for visiting Baking with Paws. Please increase the ingredients. If you proof longer, you may over proof your dough and end up with bigger crumb texture.

      Cheers :)

      Delete

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