Shokupan Japanese Soft White Bread (Yudane Method)

by - July 10, 2018

Shokupan Bread

Shokupan Bread

Shokupan Japanese Soft White Bread


Lately, I come across this fluffiest bread, Shokupan Japanese White Bread by accident while browsing through the internet.  

Shokupan means “eating bread” in Japanese and it is also commonly referred to simply as Japanese white bread.  It is quite similar to Hokkaido Milk Loaf but is less sweet and eggless.  This bread is super fluffy, soft and moist.  It seems to stay fresh longer than most other ordinary homemade bread.

Yudane method is quite similar to Tangzhong (water-roux) method.  Both methods are scalding method. For the Yudane method, boiling water is used to scald the flour instead of cooking over the fire.   I used the Yudane method shared by Chopstick Chronicles.

Please click here to see the differences between  Yudane vs Tangzhong Method. 

I have other Yudane Method recipes that you may like to try too.   Yudane Method Bread recipes.

It is advisable to read the following notes before starting baking.

GENERAL NOTES:

KNEADING TIME
For kneading, please regard the timing provided as an indication only. It is only meant as a guide.  Timing may differ depending on the brand of flour and electric mixer used. The protein content may vary from one brand of flour to another.

OVER KNEADING
Some have experienced the dough breaking during the second proofing.  If that happens it is due to over kneading.  Please stop the machine and check your dough during the final cycle of kneading to ensure that you don't over knead. Every machine is different and there is always a chance of over-kneading when using a machine. You may need to adjust this timing and stop as soon as you reach the window pane stage.

FLOUR
The right flour plays a very important role in bread making.  Usually bread flour content around 11.5 - 13.5% protein, while high gluten flour is around 13.5 - 14.5%.  All purpose flour content less protein around 9 - 11%.  To achieve fluffy, soft and light bread, I used Japan High Gluten Flour in most of my bread baking.  Sources from here and here.

HYDRATION
The liquid measurement given is also a guide.  It is advisable to always reserve some liquid and not add it all in one go.  This would give you the opportunity to adjust if necessary. If dough is too dry, add the reserve liquid one tablespoon at a time until the right consistency.  This is because each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently. 

PROOFING
Please note that the proofing timing may also vary depending on your climate and environment. The humidity and temperature at your place will influence how dough rises.  
If you are unable to judge by just looking at the dough, you can do the finger poke test:
  1. First Proofing:
    • Lightly flour or oil your finger or knuckle, gently poke in the centre of the dough then remove your finger.  If it bounces back immediately without any indentation then it needs more time.
    • If the indentation stays and it doesn’t bounce back or if the dough collapses, then the it is over proved.  
    • If it bounces back just a little, then the dough is ready to be punched down and shaping.
  2. Second Proofing:
    • Lightly press the side of the proved dough with your finger.  If it bounces back immediately without any indentation, it means the dough is under proved and needs more time before baking.
    • If the indentation stays and it doesn’t bounce back, it means it has been over proved.
    • If the indentation slowly bounces back and leave a small indentation, it is ready to bake. Or if the dough springs back slowly, like it’s waking up from a long nap, and your prod leaves only a small indentation, it’s ready to go.
    • There will be a final burst of rising once the bread is placed to bake in the oven and it is called oven spring. 
WRINKLE TOP OR SHRINKING
If your bread collapses or gets wrinkled on top after removing from oven, it could be because your dough over proved during the second proofing. Please proof your dough until it just reaches or is slightly below the rim of the pan.

BAKING
Do also note that the baking temperature and timing provided are what works for my oven and should also be regarded as a guide only. Every oven behaves a little differently, so please adjust accordingly for your oven.
If you have any questions regarding this recipe or any other post, please leave me a comment in the “LEAVE A COMMENT” link and I will reply you as soon as possible.

Recipe - Shokupan Japanese Soft White Bread 


Yields: 1 loaf

INGREDIENTS:

Yudane:
50g bread flour (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
50g boiling water

Bread:
200g bread flour  (I used Japan High Gluten Flour)
1 1/8 tsp instant yeast
1 1/2 Tbsp (15g) brown sugar
3/4 tsp salt
10g butter
145g fresh milk or full cream milk (start with 120g first, reserve 30g/2 tbsp to add in slowly if the dough too dry)

Utensils:
Loaf pan (8" X 3" X 3")


METHOD:

Yudane:
  1. Add bread flour in a bowl, pour the boiling water and mix well with spatula or spoon.  
  2. Cling film and place in the fridge for at least 4 hours or overnight.  
  3. Take out from the fridge 30 minutes before using to return to room temperature.
Note:  

I made the yudane dough 4 hours before and left it outside instead in the fridge. It works too.

Bread:
  1. Put all ingredients into the bowl of stand mixer. Using the dough hook, knead until the dough comes together, become elastic and tacky but not sticky.  It takes around 15 minutes at medium speed.   
  2. Let the dough rise in a warm place for 60 minutes or until double in size in a large greased bowl, covered with cling film or kitchen towel.
  3. Punch down the dough to release the air. Transfer the dough to a clean floured surface then divide into 2 equal portions. Form each portion to a strand/long log. Roll out each dough with a rolling pin into long rectangle shape. Roll up the dough like Swiss Roll until a small log is formed. 
  4. Place all dough in the prepared loaf pan.  Let it rise for another 45 to 60 minutes or until double in size. 
  5. 15 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 190C.
  6. Bake at preheated oven for 25 - 30 minutes, or until golden brown.
  7. Remove bread from oven and let them cool on rack completely before slicing.
Note:

I have received feedback from readers who have tried the recipe that the dough is too sticky and wet.  It could be due to the flour.  Some flour absorb less water.  If you find your dough mixture wet please reduce the water to 40g in Yudane and reduce milk to 120g.  If too dry then add 1 tablespoon of milk at a time until you achieve the desired consistency.  In this recipe, I used Japanese high gluten flour.

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30 comments

  1. can I use the dough to make the red bean bun. thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Thomas,

      Thank you for dropping by. Yes, I am sure you can.

      Cheers & Happy baking :)

      Delete
  2. Hi Yeanley
    Can I use wholemeal flour instead?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Elle,

      Thank you for asking. I am not sure if you can get this result if you used wholemeal flour. I would advise you to use 20 - 30 % wholemeal flour and 70 - 80% bread flour to try. I used Japanese high gluten flour (Bread Flour) in this recipe.

      Cheers & happy baking :)

      Delete
  3. How would excluding the brown sugar affect the recipe since I don't have any on hand.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for dropping by. You can use any sugar. The reason I used brown sugar is because it is more healthier than white sugar.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
  4. Hi Yeanley

    If I am kneading the dough on the table counter do I still have to knead it for 15 minutes and can I use all-purpoae flour?

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for your question. To be honest, I never knead my bread dough on the counter. All my bread dough are machine knead. So, I am not sure how long you should be kneading. I guess you have to knead until gluten is form and window pane stage.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
  5. How long can the bread stays soft?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thank you for asking. Mine was 3 - 4 days, I kept inside proper seal plastic bag in room temperature.

      Cheers:)

      Delete
  6. Hi, do you machine knead your dough in an aircon environment for 15mins? I'm having problem with long kneading in our room temperature. Dough becomes rough and slaggy. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Danny, Thank you for your question. I am using Kenwood Chef Mixer. So far, I don't have this issue. However, I could feel the dough very slight warm. You may want to break down the kneading into 2 sessions. Rest in between may help. By the way, this recipe dough will be slightly soft. You may want to cut down the fresh milk to 100g as some flour absorb more liquid. If too dry then add 1 tbsp at a time.

      I hope this will help.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Can this be made in a breadmachine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Yes, you can try this recipe in breadmaker. But, this the small loaf and you need to multiply the ingredients according to your breadmaker size.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  9. Dear Yeanley, Can I use bob's red mill artisan bread flour to make this bread?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there, Thank you for asking. You can. But, the texture maybe different. I used Japanese High Gluten Flour for all my soft bread recipes.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  10. Hello, can i use the recipe for pullman pan or pain de mie (8"×4"×4")

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, sorry for late response. The amount for this recipe is too small for 8X4X4" loaf pan.
      You can use the below recipe, it is also shokupan bread.
      https://www.bakewithpaws.com/2019/12/japanese-soft-white-bread.html

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  11. Hi,

    Can I replace the milk with milk powder ? How much milk powder and milk should I add?

    If using milk powder, do we need to scale the milk first? Or can add milk powder and water separately

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thank you for your questions.

      Yes, you can replace milk powder with milk. Maybe, around 2 tbsp of milk powder. You can add milk powder and water separately.

      I did not scale the milk and I understand that some recipe said that the enzyme may break down the gluten. But, it is up to you ya.

      Cheers :)

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  12. Hi,

    Can we replace milk with milk powder ? If so, how much should I add ?

    Do we need to scale the milk? Or can just add milk powder and water separately?

    Thanks !

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Yeanley, Greetings from Gosford, NSW Australia.
    Would it matter if I reduced the sugar? Would it affect the texture? The reason I ask is that I would like this to not be so sweet. This bread with such a lovely texture was delivered to my Grandmother's house by the baker in the early 1960's. Sometimes I loved it with honey, and at other times with cheese. The sweetness would not compliment the cheese. :-) Thankyou for your recipe and pictures. Best wishes Rod

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for dropping by and your question. Actually, this bread is not sweet. But, you can still reduce the sugar. It will not affect the texture of the bread. Kindly read the notes at the bottom before you starting baking.

      I hope you will like this bread too.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
  14. Hi there, can I replace the bread flour with all purpose flour? Otherwise, any possible substitute for bread flour?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for your question. You can but you will not this fluffy and soft bread as not enough gluten in AP flour. You can use spelt flour too. But, the texture is slightly different.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  15. Hi, can I use a 9x5 pan for this?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you can. But, your bread may not be this tall.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  16. hey ! So I made these, My bread is nice inside but it has wrinkles on top, any reason or something I can do to make sure it is smooth on top.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thanks for trying. If you don't want your bread to get wrinkle so much when it cool down, please proof until 80% - 90% of the size and not double the size. When proof longer, the bread will rise very tall and nice. But, when it cool down the you will get more wrinkle on top. Actually, the first picture above is taken when I just removed from the bread loaf. It get slight wrinkles too when it cool down.

      Cheers :)

      Delete

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