Basic Open Crumb Sourdough Bread (High Hydration)

by - May 05, 2019

Latest bake - 5.5 Hours Bulk Fermentation @ 26C  - 27C ⬆


Basic Open Crumb Sourdough Bread

Basic Open Crumb Sourdough Bread





This recipe and method is adapted from Full Proof Baking with slight modification.  The method for mixing and kneading using stand mixer is adapted from Delvin Tan.

This recipe is quite high hydration and maybe difficult to handle for beginner.  You may also reduce the hydration to 77%.  If you are looking for Medium Hydration Basic Open Crumb Sourdough Bread, please click this recipe.

If you have any questions regarding this recipe or any other post, please leave me a comment in the “LEAVE A COMMENT” link and I will reply you as soon as possible.


Recipe - Basic Open Crumb Sourdough Bread 


INGREDIENTS:

240g bread flour (I used Japanese high gluten flour - 12.2% protein) - 80%
60 whole wheat flour - 20%
234g water (reserve 10g for salt) - 80% final hydration *
6g salt - 2%
60g active sourdough starter/levain (100% hydration) – 20%
  • Please reserve some liquid and not add it all in one go as each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently. 
  • Banneton (proofing basket)'s size - 6.5" oval shape
  • Ambient temperature after adding in levain:  25C 

METHOD:
  1. Feed starter - Feed ratio of 1:1:1, keep at room temperature (28C – 30C) and wait until tripled, around 3 – 4 hours.  Please feed your starter at the ratio that fit your schedule as long as the starter is at its peak when use.  
  2. Autolyse - Mix flour and water, stir until there is no more dry flour with a spatula.  Or use a stand mixer with paddle attachment for 2-3 minutes at low speed.  The dough will tear easily when you pull on it. The dough is no extensibility after immediately water is added, gluten is not formed yet. Cover and leave for 2 to 3 hours at room temperature (28C - 30C).  After 2 - 3 hours I checked the window pane stage.  The dough was very extensible when I pulled on it.
  3. Levain - Wet your hand, add 60g sourdough to the dough and hand mixing until incorporated, about 3 - 4 minutes. Or use a stand mixer with hook attachment and knead for 6 to 8 minutes until window pane stage.  Cover and rest for 30 minutes.
  4. Sea Salt - Dilute sea salt with the balance of 10g water.  Pour on top of the dough, use hand to mix in the sea salt water.  It takes about 5 minutes until it is fully incorporated.  Cover and rest for 15 minutes.
  5. Bench Fold - Lightly mist the counter top with water.  Wet your hand and scrapper.  Transfer dough to the counter top.  Pull and fold the four sides, flip over and round the dough.  Return to the same bowl.  Cover and rest for about 30 minutes or until dough spreads.
  6. Lamination -  Lightly mist the counter top with water and wet your hand.  Pull from centre out to form a rectangle shape.  Pick up one edge and fold into the center.  Pick up other edge and fold into the center over first section.  Fold the top down half way.  Fold the bottom up.  Put dough in a new dish (square pyrex dish).  The reason to use a square dish is because it is easier to judge how much  the dough has spread.  Cover and rest for about 30 - 45 minutes or until dough spreads.  
  7. Coil Fold 1 -  At this stage, the dough is weak and extensible.  Fold the dough in the dish. Cover and rest for about 30 - 45 minutes or until dough spreads.
  8. Coil Fold 2 -  At this stage the dough still extensible but stronger compare with the dough  before the 1st coil fold.  Fold the dough in the dish.  Cover and rest for about 30 - 45 minutes or until dough spreads.
  9. Coil Fold 3 -  At this stage, the dough is quite strong and not so extensible and will be the last coil fold.  However, if the dough is still quite extensible and spread a lot, then you will need one or two more coil folds.   Fold the dough in the dish.  Cover and rest for 60 - 90 minutes or until dough rise 50% in size since you added the levain.  
  10. Shaping - 90 minutes later, the dough had risen about 50% in size since adding the levain.  The dough should look puffy.  It should jiggling when you slightly shake it.  This is the end of bulk fermentation.  The total fermentation time is 5 hours.  Flour the counter top.  Shape and transfer to a  flour banneton.  
  11. Proofing - Proof at room temperature for 10 - 15 minutes.  
  12. Retard - Then retard overnight in the fridge (4C) for 12 - 16 hours.  This bread is about 15 hours.
  13. Baking -  
    1. Preheat oven with the dutch oven (cast iron) at 250C for 30 minutes before baking.
    2. Take bread dough out from the fridge, invert onto a parchment paper and scoring.(Slash the dough approximately 0.5 inches deep at 45-degree angle).  Immediately transfer the dough with the parchment paper to your preheated dutch oven.
    3. Lower the temperature to 230C (fan-forced) and bake with cover on for 20 minutes.  Remove the cover and lower the temperature to 220C (fan-forced), continue bake for another 10 - 15 minutes.
    4. Remove bread from oven and dutch oven. Let it cool on rack completely before slicing.


GENERAL NOTES

HYDRATION

The liquid measurement given is also a guide.  It is advisable to always reserve some liquid and not add it all in one go.  This would give you the opportunity to adjust if necessary. If dough is too dry, add the reserve liquid one tablespoon at a time until the right consistency.  This is because each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently. 

SOURDOUGH STARTER

A healthy starter is very crucial as advised by Baking with Gina.   It is advisable to feed your starter regularly if you want your bread to rise nicely and to use the starter (levain) at its peak.  A starter that is fed regularly will be more active in general.  If the mother starter is not strong, the bread dough will not rise a lot even though the starter is used at its peak.  

There are so many ways and methods of how to maintain the starter.  Below is my method of starter maintenance.  This is just for your reference. Please try and find a way or schedule that works best for you.

I bake almost everyday.  So, my starter is left at room temperature and I feed it twice a day  at its peak when it is tripled.  

Example
10.00 am - at ratio 1:10:10 at room temperature 27C - 28C
9.00 pm - at ratio 1:10:10 at room temperature 25C - 26C 

I feed a very small amount of 1g starter + 10g water + 10g flour if I am not baking, so that I will not end up with too much discard.  When I bake, I feed the starter accordingly to make up the quantity required by the recipe to be baked. If I know that I won't be baking for a few days, I will then feed it only once a day at 1:1:1, transfer to the fridge when it is doubled, and feed again 24 hours later.

If you do not bake daily or if you bake perhaps once or twice a week, then you may place your starter in the fridge and feed once a week.  But, you will need to refresh your starter around 2 days before the baking day. There is no way around this, sourdough baking takes planning! 

How I judge my starter is healthy?  My starter usually tripled in size (or at least double) in within 3 - 4 hours at room temperature (27C - 28C) for feeding ratio of (1:1:1 = starter:water:flour)

When is a starter at its peak?  My sourdough starter is usually at its peak when it is tripled in the jar. The surface of my starter looks bubbling and uneven.  The starter will not collapse when you tap the jar.  If the starter falls it means it has already past its peak.  It usually stays at its peak within 30 - 60 minutes before it starts to reduce/fall.  

Why use starter at its peak?  This is when the starter is most active and it will result in a better rise for your bread in general.  By the way, you can use when it is doubled/before its peak too.  But, not it starts to fall.

BULK FERMENTATION

Bulk fermentation starts when you add in levain to the dough and ends when the dough is ready for shaping.  

TEMPERATURE DURING BULK FERMENTATION

Ambient temperature plays a very important part in sourdough baking.  It will affect the dough temperature and eventually affect your fermentation time.  The cooler ambient temperature will extend the fermentation time.  The greater degree of proof, the stronger the dough will be as explained by Trevor J. Wilson. 

The ambient temperature that worked for me is between 25C - 26C and bulk fermentation time is between 4.5 hours to 5.5 hours.  At the end of bulk fermentation, my dough would have increased 50% in volume.   The dough should look puffy.  It should jiggling when you slightly shake it.  This is the end of bulk fermentation.  

But, my kitchen ambient temperature (without air-conditioner) was 29C - 30C.  So, I have to bring down the temperature. 

How to bring down ambient temperature?
  1. Air-conditioner room - Rest the dough in air-conditioner room during bulk fermentation.  I used this option sometimes.  I turned on my air-conditioner when I added in levain and try to maintain temperature between 25C - 26C.
  2. Home oven (that's turned off) -  Place ice cooler packs inside along with an ambient temperature thermometer.  Then place your dough during bulk fermentation in the oven. Keep an eye on that thermometer and try to keep between 25C - 26C.

DOUGH STRENGTH AND EXTENSIBILITY

Too strong (tension or elastic) dough will take a longer time to increase (proof) in volume.  So too strong dough may not have good oven spring and open crumb.  While too weak dough (extensibility) dough may not hold it shape and rise with good oven spring too.  

So over-working the dough (too strong dough) or under-working (weak dough) may affect the crumb structure and oven spring.  

The number of coil folds is not fixed and very much depends on the strength and extensibility of the dough.  

As demonstrated in an experiment by Kristen (Full Proof Baking) the over-worked dough rose super tall but was smaller in overall size and had a more dense crumb while the control dough rose tall during the oven spring and had a better overall result.

How do we know when it is enough and no more coil folds are needed? 
We usually do 3 coil folds for this method.  However, if by the second coil fold the dough is strong with less extensibility as you lift up a part of the dough then it should be the last coil fold, or just do a half coil folds instead of full. The resistance of the dough to being folded should be an indication to refrain from folding further.

How do we know when to do the next coil fold or stretch & fold?
When the dough spreads. Please do not rely on the time given in the recipe as it is just a guideline.  Please watch your dough and not the clock.  

SALT

You may wonder why most of the recipes asked to add salt after autolyze and adding levain.  Salt will tighten the gluten and make it harder to stretch. 

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104 comments

  1. Any photo to share for the stretch n fold n also lamination part? TIA 😊

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for asking. I have shared the video link "Full Proof Baking" on my above post. Please click on it and you can watch from there ya.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  2. Hi, for the sourdough starter recipe ..why need to keep so many different days of discard dough in freezer and how to use them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Michael,

      Are you referring to the Youtube I shared on the above link? I am not sure because I am a beginner. But, she did mention that use for making pancake.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  3. Hi.. Did you do it in air cond room?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thank you for asking. No, in our Malaysian room temperature.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
    2. Hi, For my 3rd attempt, I did it in air cond room (26-27C) and I found I got better oven spring. Thanks :)

      Delete
  4. May i know if there are any differences between japanese bread flour and the normal bread flour (diamond brand) which i normally used. I am new to sourdough bread and tried making it before but it doesnt turn out well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there, thank you for asking. Sorry, I do not know the different. It is so happened that I have Japanese Bread Flour as I use it for all my bread making. But, I guess should be fine as long as high gluten or protein flour. The original recipe did not specified the special brand.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
    2. In Japan, flour is generally categorized in 2 main varieties and you should choose them according to your usage.

      Hakurikiko (薄力粉)
      Weak flour/Soft Flour - This is for baking cakes and biscuits and for general use.
      It's low in protein content (less than 8.5%).

      Kyoryokuko (強力粉)
      Strong Flour - This is for bread making.
      It's high in protein content (more than 12%)

      https://www.simplyoishii.com/flour.html

      Delete
    3. Thank you for the information. Very useful..
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  5. May i know if there are any differences between japanese bread flour and the normal bread flour (diamond brand) which i normally used. I am new to sourdough bread and tried making it before but it doesnt turn out well.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi, I am trying out SD bread for the first time and would like to try your this recipe. If I do not want whole wheat flour, can I replace it with bread flour for the same amount? Also, your water is in GRAM correct? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi there, thank you for your comment and question. Yes, the water is in gram.
    Yes, you can replace the whole wheat flour with bread flour in the same amount. I never tried used all bread flour. But, it should work.

    Cheers and happy baking :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi, i am keen to try out your recipes. Heard much about sourdough starter, can you please share how to create/prepare sourdough starter. Tq

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there, Thank you for your comment and question. I have shared the YouTune link that I I followed on How to make sourdough from scratch. Please click the link on the above post. Cheers :)

      Delete
  9. Lamination - Lightly mist the counter top with water and wet your hand. Pull from centre out to form a rectangle shape. Pick up one edge and fold into the center. Pick up other edge and fold into the center over first section. Fold the top down half way. Fold the bottom up. Put dough in a new dish (square pyrex dish). Cover and rest for 30 minutes. ???? What does this step do? thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for your question. I followed the recipe and method done by Full Proof Baking as the link I shared on the above post. If I am not wrong, it will yield open nice crumb.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  10. What does this step do?
    Lamination - Lightly mist the counter top with water and wet your hand. Pull from centre out to form a rectangle shape. Pick up one edge and fold into the center. Pick up other edge and fold into the center over first section. Fold the top down half way. Fold the bottom up. Put dough in a new dish (square pyrex dish). Cover and rest for 30 minutes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for your question. I followed the recipe and method done by Full Proof Baking as the link I shared on the above post. If I am not wrong, it will yield open nice crumb.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  11. hello ! May I know what type of whole wheat flour you are using ? I followed this recipe but my bread texture is so dense.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for asking. I used Bob's Red Mill (100% Stone Ground Whole Wheat Flour).

      Cheers:)

      Delete
  12. Hi may I know what type of whole wheat flour you are using ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry for late response. I I used Bob's Red Mill (100% Stone Ground Whole Wheat Flour).

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  13. Hi! May I know what was the difference between single attempts? It's so clear to see the developing! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for your question. Did you mean first attempt? Practice make perfect. It is improving because of the sourdough starter too, it's become stronger.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  14. Hi, do you use machine mix (stand mixer) for any of the attempt? I did try with my mixer but it takes very long to reach window pane. So wonder which brand do you use to reach window pane within 6-8 mins. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for asking. Actually, I used stand mixer to mix flour and water (step 1) and add in the levain (step 2) in all the attempts. I used Kenwood Chef stand mixer. Gluten already formed during autolyse. Do not need very long time to knead the dough after that.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  15. Hi, would you mind sharing the stand mixer brand? I can never reach window pane until 30 mins using my KW. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi, for your 1st attempt, you proof at RT for 15-20 min then retard overnight in fridge. Your 5th attempt proof for 2 hr then retard in the fridge. Why? How about your 6th attempt? You proof 15 -20min or 2 hour? Your last attempt looks very successful and wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Thank you for asking. I just tried out different method at 5th attempt, no particular reason. At 6th attempt, I proof 15 - 20 mins as per the recipe.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  17. Hi. Your attempt # 6 you say do as above.. Do you mean as first recipe or # 5 process. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there, thank you for clarification. Please refer to the method in 1st attempt. Sorry for confusion.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  18. Do you bake it on the same day? let's say after shape and proof in a banneton.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for asking. I baked after retarding in the fridge for 12 - 15 hours. But, I am sure you can bake on the same day. Cheers :)

      Delete
  19. Hi, I'm just wondering that why proofing in the aircon room has better oven spring than room temperature which is warmer in Malaysia. Is proofing in colder temperature mandatory?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, so the dough will not over proof before baking. The warmer temperature will speed up the proofing. Cheers :)

      Delete
  20. Hi, this is a fan of your blog from Singapore. I noticed that your bulk fermentation time (from addition of levain to shaping) is only 4.5 hours, versus the 6 hours recommended by Kristen from Full Proof Baking. May I know if you adjusted this, because it is hot in Malaysia, same as Singapore? I am asking because both times I tried Kristen's recipe (with 6 hours bulk fermentation), my loaves turned out gummy. It's heartbreaking! Will appreciate any advice, thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for following my posts. I cut down because of our tropical climate here. I don't want to overproof my bread during bulk fermentation and will not get spring oven. By the way, I left the dough in aircond room.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  21. Thanks for the timings for our tropical weather (I'm in singapore)! I really love lamination and coil folding but have struggled a bit with overproofing too. Just to share, I now feed my starter with cold water cos I find it works better for my timings. I also keep a very small starter, so I rarely have any discard (it was tiring trying to to use up my discard. Only 2 of us at home). Thank you for sharing your beautiful loaves and being so generous with your findings 🤗

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sharon,

      Thank you for comment. This method is adapted from "Full Proof Baking Baking". It is my pleasure to share my baking experiments. Thanks for sharing using cold water for feeding the starter. I should try this next time.

      Happy baking and cheers :)

      Delete
  22. May I know if I can use Atta flour as whole wheat flour or is it the same if I use wholemeal flour?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for asking. Whole wheat flour and wholemeal flour are two difference type of flour.

      Wholemeal flour is flour sifted through screens and at the end a certain percentage of bran is added back into it. ... Whole Wheat flour or Whole grain flour is milled from the complete seed and nothing is removed.

      From here: https://www.quora.com/How-do-wholemeal-flour-and-whole-wheat-flour-differ#:~:text=is%20called%20bran.-,Wholemeal%20flour%20is%20flour%20sifted%20through%20screens%20and%20at%20the,is%20added%20back%20into%20it.&text=has%20to%20contain.-,Whole%20Wheat%20flour%20or%20Whole%20grain%20flour%20is%20milled%20from,layers%20of%20the%20wheat%20seed.

      I have not tried using Atta and wholemeal flour yet. But, I guess it should work too. It is fun to experiment difference flour.

      Cheers and happy baking :)

      Delete
  23. hello.. I saw @fullproofbaking video before i came across your blog detailing how you amended it for warmer weather. I'll just like to ask if you managed to get it to windowpane after it a 3 hour autolyse.

    Also, my dough is 32 degrees, as opposed to the recommended 26 degrees, so im wondering if temperature had any hand in affecting the windowpane effect

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thank you for reading my post. Yes, I did get window pane stage. During autolyse period, I just left it in our tropical temperature as levain has not added yet. From my experiment, windowpane will not be effect by temperature. Temperature will affect the fermentation.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  24. Hi!

    May I know what is the size of your dutch oven?

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, I used Oval shape dutch oven from Ikea.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  25. Hi Paws, thank you so much, very good recipe that suits Asian temperature, I got quite good oven spring but still missed that ear although I tried to cut 45 degree, do you know what I missed? Also may I know what size of the oval banneton that you used? Thank you :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for trying this recipe and your comment. Please try to cut deeper next time.
      The size of banneton I have is 6.5" stated on the label. However, this is the actual size after measuring.
      6.5" X 3.5" - Base
      8.5" X 6.00" - Top

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  26. Hi, may I please check if it is supposed to be 65g levain or 75g? (25x3)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Need only 65g of levain. I usually feed slightly more as will loss some that stick on the container.
      Cheers :)

      Delete
  27. Hi I've been trying with the same method, i got the oven spring but couldn't an obvious ear, any idea why?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for trying this method. It could be the scoring. Please try to cut deeper.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  28. Hi,

    For the starter before bake day, what is the ratio amount do you feed?

    And on bake day do you use 1:1:1 ratio as well?

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, If I have been feeding everyday, then I just maintain 1:1:1. If fed only several once, then I will feed 1:3:3 then 1:1:1 or more feeding before baking day.

      I fed 1:1:1 on the bake day.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  29. hi can I use only bread flour for this recipe?

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi can i use only bread flour for this recipe? I need to reduce the water or add more flour?
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for asking. Yes, of course you can use only bread flour. Use the same amount of water is fine for 325g of bread flour.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  31. Hi! I am a new beginner of making SD bread and still failed to get an airy open crumb. I remember one of your post showed your multiple attempts of this recipes and it helps me to understand the process of making the bread. (I remember your post showed your under-proof to perfect crumbs)
    However, when I come back to your website, I could not find that post anymore. May I ask if the post is still here or it is gone for some reasons?
    Thank you so much >W<!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you for visiting this recipe again. I have removed the multiple attempts and keep the correct method after all my experiments. Actually, all are doing with room temperature. I have added additional notes on room temperature and sourdough starter on the above posts. It is advisable to read the notes before baking.

      The reasons I removed the multiple attempts is because I created confusion for other peoples. I have received a lot of private messages to clarify the different attempts.

      I hope with the extra notes will help you on your sourdough baking. Please feel free to ask any questions and I am happy to help if I know the answer.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  32. Hi Yeanley. I'm a newbie in starter with 10 days old. Only can peaked at doubled after 4 hrs feeding at 1:2:2. Can I ask how do you maintain your starter and daily feeding? Do you keep your starter at RT and discard daily after feeding? Thanks for your advise.

    By the way, sorry to hear about your loss!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Michelle, thanks for asking and welcome to sourdough baking. For the last 2 weeks I have been feeding 3 times daily. 1:2:2 in the morning and tea time. 1:5:5 overnight. I left it on my kitchen counter during day time and in air-cond room at night time. I just fed small amount.

      I hope it helps..

      Thanks and happy baking :)

      Delete
  33. Thank you very much for the info....CHiew See...this will help me alot...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for reading this recipe. Glad to hear that it helps.

      Happy baking :)

      Delete
  34. Hi, I have a question. Do we have to feed the starter with a 1:1:1 ratio to prepare for the baking? And why is that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for reading this recipe. You do not need to prepare the levain at 1:1:1. Please feed accordingly to your schedule as long as the levain is at its peak when use.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  35. Hi Paw,
    I enjoy reading your blog! I have some questions in regards with this recipe.
    - my room temperature max 21 cel, during the autolyse do I still leave it for 2-3 hours?
    - I do not have stand mixer. Do I need to knead the dough here? Or just mix it well will do?
    - Before adding the levain, window pane should be appear . What does it mean if no window pane here? What should I do if no window pane?
    - Can I replace the BF, lamination, CF to just stretch fold for 5-6 sets @40 minutes?
    Thank you n looking forward to hear from you soon.
    Yours sincerely
    Tulipmolen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for reading this recipe and your questions.

      my room temperature max 21 cel, during the autolyse do I still leave it for 2-3 hours? 1 HOUR IS FINE TOO.
      - I do not have stand mixer. Do I need to knead the dough here? Or just mix it well will do? I USED HAND MIX. PLEASE WATCH THE VIDEO.
      - Before adding the levain, window pane should be appear . What does it mean if no window pane here? What should I do if no window pane? AFTER AUTOLYSE THE DOUGH WILL BE VERY STRETCHY. WHEN YOU PULL INTO A THIN MEMBRANE LIKE HOW I SHOW IN THE VIDEO.
      - Can I replace the BF, lamination, CF to just stretch fold for 5-6 sets @40 minutes? YOU CAN TRY TO SUIT YOUR WAY. THERE ARE SO MANY METHODS.

      I hope I have answered all your questions.

      Cheers and Happy Baking :)

      Delete
  36. My dough is very wet following the recipe, is it normal? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying. This dough is quite wet initially and eventually it becomes quite strong as the video shown.
      Each flour absorbs water and hydrates differently. So, maybe try to reserve some water before adding all.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  37. Hi, I have tried the recipe and somehow I could not get the ovenspring and the dough is very difficult to manage. As I live in Singapore and te weather is just like Malaysia, wonder if you do not work in an air conditioned environment, the dough will ferment too fast. How do you avoid that? Also can you advise how to score a wet dough? My always sticks to the razor. Tjank you in advance and stay safe!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying this recipe. I live in Malaysia and we have the same weather :)

      Please read the notes I shared on the above post on TEMPERATURE DURING BULK FERMENTATION. I did share how to bring down the room temperature. I rested the in Home oven (that's turned off) - Place ice cooler packs inside along with an ambient temperature thermometer. Then place your dough during bulk fermentation in the oven. Keep an eye on that thermometer and try to keep between 24 - 26 C.

      I scored the dough immediately out from the fridge and it will be easier to score. Maybe you can put in the freezer for 5 mins to harden it if you still find difficult to share.

      By the way, please bring down the hydration to 77 - 78% if you still find hard to handle.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  38. Thank you for your reply. Will try again and if any questions can you again? ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most welcome and happy baking :)

      Delete
    2. Hello, it is me again. I seem to have problem with lamination. The dough tends to stick to the working surface and my bench scrapper although I spray with water already. And it is a little wet. Thus I am not able to stretch to a thin sheet like you do. I had lowered tbe hydration a little but same problem occurred. Could you advise? Thanks!

      Delete
    3. Hi, how is the dough texture when you bench fold? How long did you autolyse your dough? Maybe try to autolyse longer like 2 - 3 hours.

      Try to use Rubaud method for mixing during adding levain and salt.
      Watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDDnm0OiBpE

      Thanks :)

      Delete
    4. Thank you for your reply. Im still not able to do bench fold and lamination :(. I dont know what is the reason

      Delete
    5. Maybe you can try lower hydration dough first.

      https://www.bakewithpaws.com/2020/08/basic-open-crumb-sourdough-bread.html

      Cheers :)

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    6. Yes. Managed to do lamination! Yeah! Thanks for your advice. But hard to judge when BF ends tho

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    7. You are most welcome. If you practice and bake more you will know how to see and feel the dough. Cheers :)

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    8. Hihi, its me again. May I know have you tried using all SM flour? I trued twice but both time no ear and crumb is tight even with 80% hydration.

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    9. Hi Yin,

      Yes I tried before and I used 82% hydration. Please click the below INSTAGRAM link to see the post dated 2 December 2020. Need more water because of higher protein %.

      https://www.instagram.com/p/CISypbspfnZ/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  39. Hi there, sorry. newbie here in sourdough baking.

    Your recipe stated Sourdough Starter: 60g feed with 1:1:1 ratio. You also mentioned you feed yours at 1:10:10.

    Total flour showed 300g + 30g (for levain). So does this means 30g flour is used to feed the sourdough starter?

    In your case, you used 1:10:10 ratio. Does that means you use 3g starter: 30g flour: 30 water?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Thanks for reading this recipe. Please ignore the (Total flour showed 300g + 30g (for levain). It is just for calculation purpose. However, just FYI - 60g of levain contain 30g water and 30g flour.

      If your starter is very healthy starter that you have been feeding daily then you can also use 1:1:1 depend on your schedule.

      Yes I used 3g starter: 30g flour: 30 water for ratio 1:10:10

      You do not need to feed just enough for this baking. You also can feed more and use as mother stater for next feeding.

      Cheers :)

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  40. Hello,

    watched your youtube video and now reading your recipe notes. can i check if i can half the recipe for a smaller loaf?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for watching. I think is possible. But, I have not done half portion before. This is long process and you just wanted to make small loaf? Anyway it is up to you. You also may split the dough into two and make two small loaves. You can keep the another loaf in the freezer after baking if you can't finish at one time.

      Cheers :)

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    2. As I am new to sourdough, not sure how successful my loaf will turn out. The 1st loaf I made was OK except it is gummy in the centre. Thought of making half the recipe as not to waste the loaf and also trying out to feel the dough at every stage.

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    3. Happy baking and stay safe :) Try the same recipe again and again.

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  41. Hi,

    I like your sourdough and start looking at your post. I started to make sourdough and learnt that it can be knead using stand mixer to strengthen the strength as my sourdough always turned out a bit flat. Stand mixer kneading helps the oven spring but the crumbs are not big, after knead till windowpane, I rest the dough for 1.5 hr and do 2x coil foiled then proof for 2 hrs before shaping and cold retard. Is there anyway to improve and get the open big crumbs like yours? Thanks in advance for your guidance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for trying and your feedback. Yes, I agreed with you machine knead yield smaller crumb as some experienced the same too. I used hand mix.

      If you prefer machine knead, then do not mix too long. Until incorporated will do. And still use lamination and coil fold to build the gluten as method above.

      There are still other factors contributed to open crumb. Please read the general notes. Make sure your dough is well proof too. Under proof dough will get smaller crumb too. Just proof under 50% increase in size is better.

      Cheers :)

      Delete
  42. Hi, Can use the mother starter without preparing levain instead? And how to modify this recipe if need to add in rye flour?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thanks for reading this post. If you use the mother starter without refreshing, your bread will be dense, not open crumb and not rise alot. But, some people do not mind this type of bread. You can replace half of the wholewheat flour with rye.

      Cheers :)

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    2. Thanks for the reply
      I would like to ask further. I take out 10g and mix with 100g flour and 100g water to make levain. If tomorrow, i only use 60g out of the approximately 200g, can I keep the remaining levain in fridge and continue to feed once a week as a starter?

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    3. You can. You can feed in the small amount instead. You can feed 3g + 30g + 30g. But, please try to experiment at your own first because not all the starter will triple in 12 hours for ratio of 1:10:10.

      Cheers :)

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    4. thanks :)
      Just cross my finger. Hopefully it at least doubles after 18hours and I am going to try on first SD bread baking.

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    5. Hi, me again. My dough is super wet and "soft" in a way cannot perform the action from lamination onwards :D However I just continue till Coil Foil 2 now. Shall I terminate my SD bread operation now? :p

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    6. Good luck. You may want to try at lower ratio first if your starter still not very strong. 1:3:3 or 1:5:5 first. Please experiment first before baking ya.

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    7. thanks! Love all your comments :)

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    8. Hi, please hold back some water (maybe hold back 20g water) because every flour absorb water differently. I used Japan High Gluten flour (12%) which absorb more water.

      I hope it helps.

      Cheers :)

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